My 62 Lincoln Continental

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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by bhambulldog » Sun 12. Jun 2011, 16:46

Nice work. Purring like a kitten
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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by NicSanford » Sun 12. Jun 2011, 23:02

Yeah she's comin' along well. I do hear some slight lifter noise as Theo pointed out, but that shouldn't be too hard to fix until I rebuild the motor completely, hopefully next year. This week I have my master cylinder rebuild kit coming, an original 1961 shop manual with the 62 & 63 supplement guides, and my carb rebuild kit should be here by Thursday. I'll be picking up a new set of brake hoses which should fix my brake problem after the master cylinder rebuild. This has to be one of the most satisfying projects I've done. I've tinkered around with little stuff on the new cars I've had, but there's nothing like gettin' one of these old beasts runnin like new again. Thanks again, everybody, for all your feedback and help. I've learned a lot so far, and still have a long way to go.

Here's a pic I snapped while attempting to bleed the brakes, although I've since taken off that goofy lookin' light on the grille.

Cheers...
2011-05-27_20-11-56_608.jpg
Lookin' good in the Oregon rain...

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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by Theo » Mon 13. Jun 2011, 00:26

NicSanford wrote:
Theo wrote:But say, am I right hearing a lifter noise?
Is there any quick and easy way to reduce the noise without getting into the motor for now?
Not that I'm aware of. Usually after the car has been parked for a longer period, the lifters tend to clatter in the first couple of minutes until they pump up to full operational status. That's normal and not a big deal. If you hear a persisting clatter that doesn't seem to disappear after a prolonged while, then one or more lifters might have been contaminated w. engine slug or some kind of debris in the system. That's not uncommon and not a big deal either, but you'll have to replace them su##ers. I recommend to replace them all 16.
P.S. Also consider using some sort of engine oil additive that is designed to flush your engine clean of debris and residuals. They come in cans or plastic bottles, quite prizy. They are advertized to be only used in a warmed up and running engine just for striktly five minutes. This flush might help. I would give it a try.
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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by Theo » Mon 13. Jun 2011, 00:49

keithol wrote:.........The sound you are hearing is normal, and a good sign. The system uses vacuum from the engine to assist you to apply the brake. When you pump your brake pedal the large diaphragm acts like a pump and pumps air into the vacuum lines...........
Well, yes...and maybe not. I think it depends on what kind of sound it is and where it occurs. If you hear that sound while sitting in the car w. all doors closed or while driving then this might be a sign of a serious vacuum leak with a possibly fatal malfunction of the brake booster. You're more likely going to be able to apply some manual power on the brake pedal, but you'll really feel a great difference in how much pressure you'll have to use and how weak the braking power will be at the same time. This is a dangerous situation. Currently I'm probably in the same boat. I'll have to start my T-Bird after it has been sitting for a couple of years. The booster visually looks bad although it had been replaced w. a rebuilt one a few years ago. The last time I drove the car, I had exactly the problem I'm describing. It sometimes worked and sometimes not with a hearable air bleed noise when it didn't.
Nic, do you have to apply extra pressure on the pedal w. weak braking power?
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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by Theo » Mon 13. Jun 2011, 00:58

I'm with keithol. I wouldn't mess w. the brake booster too. I decided to send it in and receive a rebuilt one. There are pro rebuilders around who have the expertise and the right tools to rebuild them. Not that I'm saying that you weren't skilled enough to to it, but it would at least take some time and hassle and the right tools. On the other hand a rebuilt booster is not a cheap deal. It will cost you some diheros,....grrrHH!! Any Brake booster experts around in this forum? Who can rebuild those balloons?

Also, consider buying a replacement master cylinder. As keithol mentioned, they're hard to hone up correctly. Master cylinders are usually cheap.
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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by Theo » Mon 13. Jun 2011, 01:22

keithol wrote:There are no cylinders in the brake booster ,I would not mess with the booster until you get the hydraulic system bled out and try it out. I see from the reference picture it is a piston type booster, but all it does is help you push the pedal with the engine running. It has nothing to do with the hydraulics of the brakes.The master cylinder could very well have a problem,however. Their are several ways to bleed brakes ,but the old messy standby is to have someone pump the brake pedal several times ,then hold it down while you loosen the bleed valve at the wheel cylinder, preferably starting at the furthest one, then close the valve before the pedal is released. At first all you will get is air,so you may have to repeat this step several times at each wheel before you get clear fluid with no air bubbles coming out. Make sure the pedal is not released while the valve is open or air will be drawn in, and make sure the reservoir never goes empty ! If you get no fluid by this method loosen the brake line at the master cylinder and see if you can get fluid to pump out there, if not the master cylinder is at fault and should be replaced . If you get fluid ,try the wheel cylinder again,you may just have awakened the system, or you may have plugged brake lines or hoses. Best of luck !
keithol, you're right on the money. To make Nic understand about air in the brake lines I'd like to add that once you open the air bleed at the brake cylinder during the bleed procedure, air is not always going to escape immediately. In most cases there will be fluid to come out first. You'll have to pump the pedal quite often to make sure to flush all air pockets within the system. Once you see clean fresh brake fluid bleeding into your can you're done.
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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by NicSanford » Tue 14. Jun 2011, 14:40

Theo wrote:Nic, do you have to apply extra pressure on the pedal w. weak braking power?
Haven't gotten that far yet. I bought the car with bad brakes, and the first time I tried them is when I noticed the vacuum leak. I have found that the leak is coming from an output that's supposed to connect to the vacuum powered door locks, and some other internal vacuum powered system. Figure for now I'll just bypass those or clamp them down so everything else works. Turns out just the vacuum system used for the power door locks is pretty complicated, or maybe just too complicated for me. I'll figure it out though... ;-)

Thank you Theo...

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Re: My 62 Lincoln Continental

Post by Theo » Tue 14. Jun 2011, 18:05

You'll have to block all opened vacuum line connections. There are small rubber caps in different diameters available. Once you blocked all of them check your brakes again. If the suspect sound is gone, then things might be o.k. w. your brake booster. But agailn. ou have to test the brakes.
Vacuum operated devices in cars can get a headache since the lines are often hard to access. Those vacuum lines tend to dry out, get brittle or simply slip off from their connections. You'll need a shop manual where you can view the routing.
Also check if the AC flaps are vacuum operated. Dunno if that is the case with a Lincoln. I don't own a Lincoln. But hey, It only takes to disassemble the dashboard ,....;)
Hopefully not. Good luck.
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1962 Lincoln Continental Master Cylinder Honing

Post by NicSanford » Thu 16. Jun 2011, 02:10

Just received my master cylinder rebuild kit, and took some time taking it apart and cleaning it. First soaked it in a degreaser over night, then wire brushed the outside and the cap. Here is a video I took after honing it for a while.

Last edited by NicSanford on Sat 18. Jun 2011, 00:22, edited 1 time in total.

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62 Lincoln Continental Master Cylinder Rebuild

Post by NicSanford » Thu 16. Jun 2011, 02:48

Found a sticky piston after rebuilding my master cylinder. Not sure if it requires a counter pressure from the brake lines to push the piston back towards the booster, but I might end up buying a new master cylinder. Found a replacement made by Cordone for about $34. Not sure if this is a good brand, but from the description, it looks promising. Any thoughts?

Last edited by NicSanford on Sat 18. Jun 2011, 00:30, edited 1 time in total.

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