DIY 044 BRAKE UPGRADE retrofitting a new Dual Master Cylinder and Booster. 01/17/2020

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59lincolnrag
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DIY 044 BRAKE UPGRADE retrofitting a new Dual Master Cylinder and Booster. 01/17/2020

Post by 59lincolnrag » Tue 28. Sep 2010, 06:39

DIY044 BRAKE UPGRADE retrofitting a new Dual Master Cylinder and Booster and Trouble Shooting.
Additional Information and pictures added 07/04/2019 Rev C
Additional Information how to calculate brake pedal ratio added 07/14/2020 Rev D

Rev B: Additional Information added Detail . 3/25/12.
Rev C: Additional Information and pictures added 07/04/2019.
Rev D: Revised to show modified short pin between master and booster and Trouble Shooting 01/17/2020
20190624_123235.jpg
This is a great unit to replace a Bendix Treadle-vac.
Universal 7" dual diaphragm power booster with 1" bore master cylinder for drum/drum applications. The fluid reservoirs need to be the same in size and or volume. Additionally there is no proportioning valve needed ...... nor is their a residual valve.
There are many suppliers out there. You can source these items separately and get them for a good price. Be sure it is designed for a Drum / Drum system.

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This is a view of the front of the booster. There will be a short rod supplied with the Master that goes here.

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Make sure the Master fits in this cavity.

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This short pin will be inserted into the Master

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The pin inserted into the Master

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Measure the length of the pin. It needs to be .020" shorter than the actual length measured. This insures pistons are at the rest position. This allows fluid to flow from the fluid reservoir to cylinder for normal operation.

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To the left is the re-sized rod. To the right is the original length.

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The pin may need to be ground down in order to fit and allow the Master Cylinder to function Properly.

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If, when placing the Master on top of the Booster it does not drop in, the short rod will need to be sized.

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You will need to make an adapter plate to fit it to the firewall. I used the old back plate from the original Treadle-Vac unit.

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Here is another view.

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Bolt the plate in place as shown.

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Attach the Master
NOTE> BE SURE TO BENCH BLEED THE MASTER BEFORE INSTALLING IT TO THE BOOSTER!

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I cut to length and threaded the factory T/V connecting rod. I made it the same length as the original unit and it is adjustable.
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This is why you need to change your brake fluid

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Brake light switch Part #80172 Is a bit more reliable than the old pressure switch that tends to leak. This will be mounted under the dash. I will mock up a bracket to be sure it works properly.

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There is plenty of real estate in the Lincoln to Mount this unit

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You can mount the original style pressure switch as shown if you prefer.

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Here is the Junction where one rear and two front brake lines meet.The line running up to the master I will reuse. For the two front brake lines. I will block off the rear brake line port with a plug. I will add an additional junction for the rear brake line and extended it up to the master. The line traveling down is the right front brake. The rear line and the left front line enter the original junction block on the far side of the fire wall not visible in this picture.

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The line on the right is the rear brake line . The one on the left is the Left Front. This the the view from inside the fender well.

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I will disconnect the rear brake line and plug the port. Using a new junction box I will route the line through the fire wall up to the Master.

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I fabricated a mounting bracket. This is how it will mount. SOME OF THESE PICS TURNED SIDEWAYS!! ? Not sure whats wrong.

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Bore a hole through the firewall.

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Attach the junction as shown.

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Remove the rear Brake Line andPlug the bottom of the Junction on the left. Move the rear Brake line over and attach it to the new Junction Block on the right. Notice the plug on top.

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Here is the business side. You will need to make a connection from here to the master.

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There ya go!


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Job Done!


Of course there are other options you can explore as well.
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Trouble Shooting:

No brake pedal condition
A “no brake pedal” condition can be encountered after a new master cylinder is installed, leading you to believe that the master cylinder is defective. This is likely not the case; the condition can be caused by the piston sticking in bore of the master cylinder during the bleeding process when the brake system is manually bled. The brake pedal will go to the floor and subsequent efforts to get a satisfactory brake pedal will fail. A good indication of this condition is lack of fluid flow from the brake bleeders.
1. Ensure master cylinder is bench bled prior to installation.
2. Follow the vehicle’s manufacturer-specified bleeding procedure.
When the system is manually bled, the pedal is often depressed completely, moving the primary and secondary pistons to their extreme forward position. The primary piston can stick even though there are springs attempting to push it back in position.
When a master cylinder is assembled, the seals and cylinder bore are lubricated for a positive seal. This combined with air trapped in the system can cause a vacuum lock in the cylinder, causing the pistons to stick. When the piston is stuck in the applied position, you can see the ports supplying fluid are blocked and will not fill the cylinder and operate properly.
You can verify this condition by removing the master cylinder from the booster without disconnecting the brake lines. You will notice that the master cylinder piston is not resting against the snap ring.
Occasionally connecting a pressure bleeder and opening wheel bleeder screws will cause the piston to return. You can also tap lightly on the housing, with the bleeders open, to free the piston. After the piston has returned to its correct position and air is bled from the system, the problem should not reoccur.

A hard brake pedal may caused by a tripped pressure differential valve, or insufficient vacuum pressure creating a "too-hard" brake pedal. Pedal ratio is sometimes overlooked as a potential cause of a stiff pedal.
Pedal ratio refers to the relationship between the pedal's pivot points and the length of the brake pedal. The pedal is used as a lever to apply motion/force to the booster (or directly to the master cylinder if your car does not have a power booster) based on the length of the pedal. If the pedal ratio is incorrect by as little as 1/4”, this can allow too little push-rod to move through to the booster. This, in turn prevents the booster from moving the piston into the master cylinder. The hard pedal you are feeling is actually the bottoming out of the pedal and its movement but leaving stroke within the master cylinder and therefore brake pressure at the wheels.
Correcting the pedal ratio can be difficult if it means moving the pedal pivot. Correcting the pedal can be as simple as relocating the connection point of the push-rod between the pedal and the booster.

For reference, a power system should have a pedal ratio of 4:1 a manual brake system should be 6:1.

Formula for Pedal Ratio:
Pedal ratio is the ratio of leverage your brake pedal applies to the master cylinder. To determine the pedal ratio you need to measure the height of the pedal to the pivot point then divided the measurement of the pivot point to the arm that controls your rod to the master cylinder.

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Brake_Pedal_ratios_zpsa591343d-1.jpg
Brake_Pedal_ratios_zpsa591343d-1.jpg (8.91 KiB) Viewed 1155 times
A = height of pedal
B = center to center measurement of the upper arm
C = pedal ratio A divided by B equals C

Or example 9″ divided by 1.5″ equal 6 to 1 ratio.

If you apply 100 pounds of pressure to the brake pedal, 100 pounds X (6 to 1) = 600 pounds of pressure. So, if the brake pedal has been modified from its’ original design the pedal ratio is effected drastically. You can now see the pedal ratio is a “multiplier” of the pressure you apply with your foot, because this is the leverage that is applied to the master cylinder.

Now, take this same formula and substitute 2″ instead of 1.5″ you end up with a 4.5 to 1 ratio. Multiply 4.5 times the 100 pounds of applied pressure and you get 450 pounds instead of 600 pound. That half inch cost you 25 percent of your braking power. The same thing applies when you shorten the upper measurement.
This also applies to your clutch pedal as well
2002 Lincoln Blackwood
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe blk on blk
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible wht on wht
2006 Lincoln Town Car

430 6V
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Re: DIY002B retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder.

Post by 430 6V » Thu 15. Mar 2012, 20:36

I'm going to try a late model Crown Vic unit. There are a few good ones in a local yard and they look and mount similar to the one pictured.

Might be a low cost alternative. (adaption required)

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59lincolnrag
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Re: DIY002B retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder.

Post by 59lincolnrag » Thu 22. Mar 2012, 13:41

That will work on some models .... However on cars like my 1959 Lincoln. I have 4 wheel drums ......So the fluid reservoirs need to be the same in size and or volume. Additionally there is no proportioning valve ...... nor is their a residual valve.
The residual valve will cause the brakes to drag.
On such a massive beast I would be happy to just stop.! Keep in mind the above unit pictured is designed for use with drum brakes....
There is a guy that used the above setup with much success, No proportioning valve and no residual valve on a 1960 Lincoln.
On the original set-up the one master operated all four drums at once.The way the system is deigned the Wheel Cylinder size alone acts as the proportioning device. So the front wheel cylinders are larger thus more stopping effort up front.
2002 Lincoln Blackwood
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe blk on blk
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible wht on wht
2006 Lincoln Town Car

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Re: DIY002B retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder.

Post by 430 6V » Sat 24. Mar 2012, 20:19

They don't list a master/booster specifically for a '58 to '60 Lincoln with 4 wheel drum.

The pic you posted looks like their model 1501 universal for disc drum.

Another source for that assembly is Speedway Motors. http://www.speedwaymotors.com/Single-Di ... ,1983.html

The crown Vic unit doesn't have a built in proportioning valve, none do, and with a 10psi residual valve for the front it should work just fine.

We'll see

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Re: DIY002B retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder.

Post by 60MKV » Mon 20. Jan 2014, 22:34

Hmmm.... 1" bore is quite a lot larger than original .62" bore. I bought a retrofit 7/8 m/c from an 88 buick regal which also has the resivour angled to exactly match the angle from the firewall to horizon, and without the large vacuum resivour connected its a bit sketchy. This is with an aftermarket dual diaphragm booster which is miles more boost than stock, and more than similar single diaphragm units.

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59lincolnrag
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Re: DIY002C retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder. Updated

Post by 59lincolnrag » Tue 9. Jul 2019, 10:00

To all: Retrofitting a new Dual Master Cylinder.
Additional Information and pictures added 07/04/2019 Rev C
2002 Lincoln Blackwood
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe blk on blk
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible wht on wht
2006 Lincoln Town Car

Ken L
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Re: DIY002C retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder. Updated

Post by Ken L » Tue 9. Jul 2019, 10:31

Nice job!
I put a ClassicDiscBrakes power-front disc kit on my Edsel Corsair. Other than making a custom pushrod and some slight tweaking of the caliper mounts it was all there and bolt on. Works great.

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59lincolnrag
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Re: DIY002C retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder. Updated

Post by 59lincolnrag » Tue 9. Jul 2019, 13:29

Why not post it here !
2002 Lincoln Blackwood
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe blk on blk
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible wht on wht
2006 Lincoln Town Car

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Re: DIY002C retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder. Updated

Post by barry.wilkinson » Wed 4. Sep 2019, 12:35

Hi did the 7inch dia booster fit ok under the hood
My treadle vac is only 5 1/4 inches dia and there’s not much room between it and the inner fender probably an inch or so

I’m not sure whether to rebuild the original unit or go for the upgrade

Thanks
Barry

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59lincolnrag
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Re: DIY002C retrofitting a new dual master Cylinder. Updated

Post by 59lincolnrag » Wed 4. Sep 2019, 14:22

Barry,
It fits just fine under my hood . There is plenty of real estate under there as you can see.
What car are you working on? Why not get a piece of cardboard and make a circle. and see how it may fit.
2002 Lincoln Blackwood
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe blk on blk
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible wht on wht
2006 Lincoln Town Car

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