DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.RevB

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DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.RevB

Post by 59lincolnrag » Wed 11. Mar 2009, 09:13

First in a Series DIY001 Bendix Treadel-Vac Restoration.

Rev-A Information about the counter bore. (59lincolnrag)
Rev-B New Identity information codes added / proper identification of this unit./ was Hydraulic- Reaction Type (a58pacer)

Special note: there were several types of power cylinders used. I will cover the Disc- Reaction Type. Its very simple in design and easy for the DIY guy or gal.

Bendix Power Assist Units

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Poppet-Valve Type ( I will cover this model in a future publication. Parts are not available for the booster )
Lincoln 1956-1958 (L-3, L-4, L-5 and L-6)
Continental Mark II 1956-1957 (F)
Mercury 1956 (M and M-3)

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Hydraulic- Reaction Type
Edsel 1958 (M-5 and E-1)
Mercury 1957-1958 (M-5)

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Disc- Reaction Type
Edsel V-8 1959 (E-2)
Lincoln 1959-1960 (L-7 and L-8)

Bendix Power-Vac
Lincoln 1961-1964
Ford 1960-1961

Bendix Master-Vac
Mercury 1959-1961 (M, M-1, M-2 and F-2)
Thunderbird 1959-1961 (T and T-1)
Ford V-8 1959-1961 (F, F-1 and F-2)
Edsel V-8 1960 (F-1)

Bendix Hydro-Vac
Dealer add-on (booster only) for Mercury and Edsel.
Kits were also available from Bendix for nearly
any other make of car, 1949 on.
TV_id.jpg
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********************************************************************************************************************************************
Disc - Reaction Type

This unit is one of the most problematic parts on our cars. It also requires a regular maintenance schedule
Note that the shaft of this unit displaces the brake fluid, unlike a conventional master cylinder.
After dis-assembly the casting must be inspected. The inside counter-bore should be free of deterioration. Pitting of any kind will make this casting unusable. This is the root cause of total brake failure.
DO NOT HONE THE COUNTER BORE ….It cannot be resurfaced ! (Photo DSCN3739)

(The casting can be bored out and sleeved with a stainless steel insert.)

It is very important that the rubber packing along with the Bakelite washer and steel washer fit snug in the bore.
The rest of the Restoration is straight forward.
DSCN3735-vi.jpg
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DSCN3736-vi.jpg
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Picture 3734 through 3737 show the major components prepped refinished and ready for re-assembly
Alcohol is used to lubricate the rubber components for assembly.

DSCN3738-vi.jpg
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Picture 3738 Shows the use of a 1 ¼ socket to install the check valve.
The check valve tension spring and fitting are the three items on top shown in frame 3736.
In order of assembly: valve spring, check valve, seal o-ring and valve fitting.

DSCN3739-vi.jpg
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Picture 3739 Shows the Packing Assembly in order.
Note: The counter bore is clean and free of pitting!

A little more information on the counter bore...........
The rubber packing fits into the counter bore as shown in the above illustration. The leading edge of the packing seal will go in first followed by the packing expansion bushing and then the washers, retaining ring and finally the leather seal. The counter bore must be free of scratches pitting gouges etc. on order for the rubber packing to do its job. Note that the leading edge seals against the bottom of the counter bore. You exert at least 150 -200 PSI when you step on the brake pedal. That is why the bore needs to be perfect. It really only seals in the first 1/16 of an inch in the bore …right down in the corner. If you hone the bore you will scratch the surface of the casting disturbing the green anodizing on the casting and allow brake fluid to seep past eventually allowing brake fluid to fill the booster and cause a soft pedal. The green anodizing seals the casting from the corrosion forces of the brake fluid. So if you’re loosing fluid and there are no leaks ….. Look again!
When you pull the unit for service it will be full of fluid. Not to mention the vacuum reserve tank will fill up as well. Believe me it holds a lot of fluid. You will be filling all the time….With no visible leaks. This running low on fluid is the number one reason for failure. The casting condition is critical. However; It can be sleeved and re-anodized, but with caution.
Additionally, the inner portion of the packing seal rubs or seals against the plunger (shaft) it too must be free of nicks, scratches etc. If it is worn scratched or nicked it mist be replaced.


Assemble over the steel plunger In order of assembly: steel cup retainer, rubber packing cup, Bakelite backing washer and steel stop washer. Then install the snap ring.

DSCN3740-vi.jpg
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Picture 3740 Shows the Packing Assembly in the bore.
DSCN3741-vi.jpg
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Picture 3741 Shows the steel ring at the end of the plunger that “tips” the compensating valve.
The compensating valve, sometimes called the tipper valve, is located at the bottom of the master cylinder reservoir.
A word of caution:
The tipper valve is actuated at the last fraction of an inch of the master cylinder plunger rod travel during return. It replenishes the pressure side of the brake system from the reservoir, and over a period of time, if the pressure side of the system is starved of fluid, the brakes will not work.

This allows brake fluid to enter the chamber. Refer to frame 3736 and ….
Set plunger about 1 inch inward before installing the compensator valve.
In order of assembly: insert compensating valve stem into compensating valve fitting . Then place cone shaped compensating valve spring over valve stem and assemble retaining clip.
Lubricate fitting seal o-ring with alcohol and install to master cylinder.

DSCN3743-vi.jpg
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Picture 3743 Shows the outer plunger seal and hydraulic seal place them in order shown
Note: The replacement outer plunger seal is made with a leather insert. Refer to frame 3742. Daub your finger in Neatsfoot oil and coat the inner seal before installation. This Neats-foot oil can be purchased at any sporting goods store or an All American country hardware store you know …the old fashion store that’s got it all… The way the seal is pictured is the way it goes on. The steel plunger has a chamfer so as not to cut the seal. Wipe a small amount of Neatsfoot oil on the end of plunger and carefully place the seal over the end with a twist

DSCN3744-vi.jpg
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Picture 3744 Insert to the master cylinder.
DSCN3745-vi.jpg
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Picture 3745 place cork gasket to the master cylinder as shown.
DSCN3746-vi.jpg
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DSCN3747-vi.jpg
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DSCN3748-vi.jpg
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Picture 3746, 3747, 3748 Install power booster cylinder to the master cylinder. Using 3 bolts as shown.
DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN BOLTS. Snug….Use a ¼ drive socket set

A word of caution:
You must change the brake fluid at least every 2 years to rid the system of moisture. Refresh the fluid and bleed the system.
Last edited by 59lincolnrag on Wed 6. Oct 2010, 16:24, edited 17 times in total.
Reason: added more detail and caution note...
2002 Lincoln Blackwood Black on Black on Black on Black ...did I say Black...
2007 Mercury Gran Marquis
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe (blk on blk)
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible (wht on wht)

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by a58pacer » Thu 30. Sep 2010, 13:41


Bendix Power Assist Units

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Poppet-Valve Type ( I will cover this model in a future publication. Parts are not available for the booster )
Lincoln 1956-1958
Continental Mark II 1956-1957
Mercury 1956

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Hydraulic- Reaction Type
Lincoln 1959-1960
Mercury 1956-1958

Bendix Power-Vac
Lincoln 1961-1964
Ford 1960-1961

Bendix Master-Vac
Mercury 1959-1961
Thunderbird 1960-1961
Even though Edsel used the MEL block only the first model year it would be helpful to include it, if for nothing else than for giving another source for spare parts. Also, the identifying stamp on the end of the master cylinder casting is useful in many cases. May I suggest the following wording:

Bendix Power Assist Units

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Poppet-Valve Type ( I will cover this model in a future publication. Parts are not available for the booster )
Lincoln 1956-1958 (L-3, L-4, L-5 and L-6)
Continental Mark II 1956-1957 (F)
Mercury 1956 (M and M-3)

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Hydraulic- Reaction Type
Edsel 1958 (M-5 and E-1)
Mercury 1957-1958 (M-5)

Bendix Treadle-Vac
Disc- Reaction Type
Edsel V-8 1959 (E-2)
Lincoln 1959-1960 (L-7 and L-8)

Bendix Power-Vac
Lincoln 1961-1964
Ford 1960-1961

Bendix Master-Vac
Mercury 1959-1961 (M, M-1, M-2 and F-2)
Thunderbird 1959-1961 (T and T-1)
Ford V-8 1959-1961 (F, F-1 and F-2)
Edsel V-8 1960 (F-1)

Bendix Hydro-Vac
Dealer add-on (booster only) for Mercury and Edsel.
Kits were also available from Bendix for nearly
any other make of car, 1949 on.

While this is most-definitely off-topic, it may be of interest that the
1957-58 Ford, 1956-58 Thunderbird, and 6-cylinder Ford and Edsel 1958-60
used the Kelsey Hayes bellows type booster under the pedal linkage.

1954-56 Ford and 1955 T-bird used a Midland Hy-Power unit.

I can't verify the Power-Vac applications. My Bendix book shows it used only on 1957-'61 Mopar and 1960-'61 Hyster.

Great article and very informative. The pictures help a lot. One small point to consider, however.

While the unit being rebuilt in this article may have started out as a Hydraulic Reaction Treadle-Vac, it isn't being rebuilt as one. Or, it might have been a Disc Reaction style as used on the 1959/60 Lincoln and 1959 Edsel, but I'm not positive. This unit is different from others I've seen because of the bleed fitting on the end of the master cylinder casting, and the fluid reservoir cover has a bulge which levels the filler cap when the unit is installed on a vertical mounting surface. Many Treadle-Vacs have a slanted reservoir cover because the unit was originally designed to mount on an angled floor board directly underneath the brake pedal.

The problem here (and it may not readily be identified as a problem while the unit is in use) is that none of the critical components for Hydraulic Reaction or Disc Reaction are present in the photos. The reaction components help ease the "grabby" feel the Treadle-Vac will otherwise tend to present to the driver. In fact, one of the possible causes of "grabby" brakes with the Hydraulic Reaction Treadle-Vac is a broken counter-reaction spring on the hydraulic reaction feedback rod.
(Source: Brake Service Manual BR-1005, Paul Marsh Company, page 233, also published as Chilton's Standard Hydraulic and Power Brake Service Manual, 1958 and 1959)

To the best of my knowledge, all 1956 Mercurys used the Poppet Valve Type Treadle-Vac, and 1957/58 Mercury and 1958 Edsel, all models, used the Hydraulic Reaction type. The Hydraulic Reaction T-V was also used on 1957 Buick (B and B-1), 1957 (C-3) and '58 Chevrolet (C-4), 1957 (PO-2) and 1958 Pontiac (PO-3), late 1957 (O-6), '58 (O-6 and O-8) and early '59 (O-9) Oldsmobile, late 1957 (N-2 and R-2) and 1958 American Motors (N-4), and 1959 Checker (CM). The Checker unit shares nearly all of its internals with the Mercury and Edsel units. The Edsel and Mercury units are identical, except the Edsel junior series has a longer input rod connecting to the brake pedal linkage. The other makes share many internals, and can often be used as part sources for FoMoCo applications.

The Disc Reaction type of Treadle-Vac was used on 1959 and 1960 Lincoln, 1959 Edsel, late 1959 Oldsmobile (O-10) and 1959 American Motors (N-5).

The Hydraulic Reaction Type of Treadle-Vac has a feedback rod going lengthwise through the counter bore displacement rod which transmits hydraulic pressure information back to the air (vacuum) valve in the vacuum piston, thus modulating the vacuum assist as a function of hydraulic pressure. This presents a pedal "feel" to the driver giving a sensation of how much braking is being applied at the hydraulic end. The counter-bore displacement rod for any other type of 5-1/4" Treadle-Vac (the i.d. of the vacuum piston cylinder) is available new for about $30. However, a damaged Hydraulic Reaction type counter bore displacement rod must be sleeved and re-used, because replacements are not readily available.

The counter-bore displacement rod shown in this procedure is solid . . . there is no hydraulic reaction feedback rod.

The later Disc Reaction type of Treadle-Vac used the solid counter-bore displacement rod, but also had a somewhat pliable rubber or plastic disc cushioning the vacuum piston against the end of the displacement rod. This disc reaction cushion (Bendix P.N. 378976 for all DIsc Reaction Treadle-Vacs) is conspicuous in its absence here. Picture 3763 in Part 2 of this rebuild procedure shows a daub of grease applied to the plunger receiver on the vacuum piston forward surface precisely where the reaction disc would be inserted. This may be an attempt at introducing the disc reaction feedback (referred to as "reaction force" in the 1959 Edsel Maintenance Manual). That book describes the reaction force as giving the driver a "feel" of the amount of braking. The book also does *not* mention using the daub of grease on the plunger receiver.

One other small detail: DSCN3736-vi.jpg, it should be explained, shows a 1959-type residual check valve and cup for Disc Reaction Treadle-Vac. It differs from the 1955-58 FoMoCo-type residual check valve (also used on 1959 Checker and 1960 Lincoln) and the 1952-58 GM/AMC/Packard check valve and cup (also used on FoMoCo through 1954). Bendix used three different sets of part numbers for the components used in the three types of residual check valve systems. The 1955-58 FoMoCo system uses an integral check valve and spring (P.N. 377130) to be used with a check valve cup (P.N. 377129, not to be confused with the larger residual check valve spring shown in the photo, P.N. 375976) . The 1952-58 GM/AMC/Packard system uses a check valve diaphragm (P.N. 375966) over sort of a small, thimble-shaped cup (P.N. 375967). The 1959-60 residual check valve system uses just a flexible rubber boot fit over a perforated, slightly cupped disc without the small spring valve or cup (P.N. 379008). While the master cylinders are different part numbers, I haven't checked dimensions to see if they are different at the residual check valve orifice, so substituting the 1959 style residual check valve in a 1952-58 GM/AMC/Packard or FoMoCo application may be acceptable. At any rate, all the residual check valve does is maintains about 10psi in the hydraulic lines when the brake pedal is fully released, and this alone can be measured to verify correct operation. It really has nothing to do with the hydraulic or disc reaction feedback.

gauss
Attachments
NEW-1.JPG
TREADLE-VAC RESIDUAL CHECK VALVES: 1952-58 GM/AMC/Packard style is on the left, 1955-58 FoMoCo style is in the center (also used on 1960 Lincoln), and the universal 1959/60 style is on the right. The soft rubber valve parts alone are shown in the top row, the hard cup parts in the center row, and the assembly of the two on the bottom row.
Last edited by a58pacer on Tue 15. Nov 2011, 15:04, edited 6 times in total.

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by a58pacer » Thu 30. Sep 2010, 20:58

The steel plunger has a chamfer so as not to cut the seal. Wipe a small amount of Neatsfoot oil on the end of plunger and carefully place the seal over the end with a twist
That's not what I've seen on a real 1957/58 Hydraulic Reaction Treadle Vac. The groove near the aft end of the displacement plunger will cut the H-E-double Q out of the leather plunger seal if you don't wrap it with something first. I've made a nifty, re-usable tool out of a sheet of brass shim stock. I've curled a precisely-cut square of shim stock into a cylinder of an inside diameter a little less than the o.d. of the plunger (displacement rod) and I slip in onto the end of the rod, but leave it in a cone shape. After moistening the leather seal, I can work it half-way up the cone-shaped shim stock until it's just stretched tight enough to fit on the displacement rod's o.d. Then I work the shim stock cone into a cylinder that covers the cut annular recess a little less than an inch back from the end of the rod. At that point, the leather seal will slide right over the shim stock shield and cut recess, and seat into its proper location without damage. Then, the shim stock slides off the rod, and back into my tool drawer.

That displacement rod with the chamfered edges pictured in the procedure isn't typical of original Hydraulic Reaction Treadle-Vacs.

gauss
Last edited by a58pacer on Tue 15. Nov 2011, 15:05, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by 59lincolnrag » Fri 1. Oct 2010, 06:49

A58pacer,
Thank you for the clarification......The ID codes is what I have been looking for, thats a big help.
Yes it seems that the displacement plunger I used did have a chamfer on it several units have a chamfer. I can only assume that these were rebuilt units at on time.??
But yes the method you describe is a great way not to cut or distort the leather seal. I have used masking tape as well

BTW ...........
This unit is from my 59 Lincoln driver and as you indicated is a mix of various parts. Maybe not correct as an assembly that is to say a "matching numbers" set of parts, but a working assembly. For the 10 or so units I have laying about I selected the two best casting to use for my two Lincolns. BTW the other 59 Lincoln has the older style pop valve type booster....politically incorrect......So as you can see I have to deal with what I have available. These cars both use the reaction type booster assembly which is what I assembled for each of the vehicles.
Ok ...so my question to you is you mention Hydraulic Reaction and Disc Reaction I'm not sure I follow, are they the same? ....Pop Type ? that uses the pop valves of course.
2002 Lincoln Blackwood Black on Black on Black on Black ...did I say Black...
2007 Mercury Gran Marquis
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe (blk on blk)
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible (wht on wht)

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by a58pacer » Fri 1. Oct 2010, 14:38

Hydraulic Reaction and Disc Reaction Treadle-Vacs are distinct beasts. They use many of the same rebuild parts, though, so the common T-V kit can be used for both.

Disc Reaction uses a pliable rubber or plastic pad in the vacuum cylinder displacement rod port where you put the daub of grease. What is the grease for? Did Kanter recommend that? If so, it might be for a reaction disc pad substitute.

Hydraulic Reaction uses a unique displacement rod with a feedback rod going through the center to transmit hydraulic "feel" back to the pedal via the vacuum piston.
1958 TV.jpg
System used with 1957-58 Mercury and 1958 Edsel. Keys 83 and 84 in this drawing were also used for 1960 Lincoln (see below).
1959 TV.jpg
System used with 1959 and 1960 Lincoln, and 1959 Edsel, except the 1960 Lincoln used the residual check valve parts from the 1955-58 FoMoCo Treadle-Vacs. Consequently, key 61 in this drawing is not used for 1960 Lincoln.
These are Bendix drawings from the 1962 Service and Sales Catalog. Each key number on the drawings may translate out to different Bendix numbers depending on the year and make of application.

What's really significant here is the difference in the displacement rod, key 60 in the upper drawing and key 45 in the lower. Notice the Disc Reaction displacement plunger is solid, and an additional part identified as key 24 is shown at the upper right hand corner of the lower drawing. That's the reaction disc. Bendix numbered it 378976. The 1958 Hydraulic Reaction rod has some other extra parts, a key 58 spring, and a key 59 spring washer. The displacement plunger, key 60, has a feedback rod going down the center. Some of the other parts vary a little as well. Those Hydraulic Reaction parts don't come with the kits as we get them today.

Also notice the difference in the residual check valve, keys 83 and 84 on the upper drawing, and key 61 on the lower. This has, of course, nothing to do with the reaction feedback system, and I'm beginning to lean toward the opinion that the newest incarnation of this beast can be safely used on all Treadle-Vacs. But I'd like to mic out the residual check valve orifice on these two units just to make sure they're dimensionally equivalent, at least from an operational standpoint. The good news is the master cylinder casting is Bendix P.N. 378475 for both 1959 and 1960 Lincoln, even though Bendix says the two year models use two different residual check valve systems. That's a real good indication the one piece system you find in today's common rebuild kits will work satisfactorily as a replacement for either original system. I suppose I could dig back farther and verify it would work for the even older 1952-58 GM/AMC/Packard check valves, but that's off topic.

I have similar drawings for the Slide Valve and Poppet Valve Treadle-Vacs, if anyone's interested, although the only MEL block car to use those older systems was the 1958 Lincoln with Poppet Valve Treadle-Vac.

Hope this helps. Have you noticed any grabbing of the brakes? Unless that daub of grease results in some sort of pedal "feel" feedback from the hydraulic system, putting a Disc Reaction T-V together without the Reaction Disc might result in brakes that are bit "grabby".

Also, could you clarify how the Treadle-Vac should be detailed on the outside surfaces? I notice you have painted everything except the master cylinder and the hydraulic outlet fitting. There is a heated disagreement going on over at the Edsel forums. Some insist these units were painted all black. Yet I've seen them come with shiny black paint on everything except the anodized grayish-green master cylinder and the natural finish outlet fitting. How did they look as new? Group, can anyone post factory engine compartment photos of a new 1952 through 1960 Lincoln, or 1952 through 1958 Mercury showing the color of a new Treadle-Vac?

gauss
Last edited by a58pacer on Tue 15. Nov 2011, 15:06, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by sidesho_bob1961 » Fri 1. Oct 2010, 14:51

59lincolnrag,

What are you basing the way that you're detailing (painting the individual colors) this Treadle Vac on?? Do you have any factory photos that show that this is the way they were manufactured?? Every one that I've seen is entirely black, hence I've come to the conclusion that they were painted after factory assembly. There is definitely a green coating on the aluminum M/C casting under the black paint, as you've stated.........If you have any vintage photo evidence, please share with the group.

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Re: DIY001 First in a Series Bendix Tredel-Vac Restoration.

Post by 59lincolnrag » Mon 4. Oct 2010, 05:35

Most people claim that it needs to be all black. I just paint it the way I want it to look. Some booster housings were actually cad plated ....Most painted black. The castings were all green anodized. Green casting with a gloss black booster is correct ..... there are variations. I used the Hammer-tone silver and then you can coat it green with that opaque paint from Dupli-color to give you that green tint. In fact some of the casting tops / covers are copper I polished and clear coated it instead of black.
The green anodize comes off over the years that's why most re-builders paint them black. The green anodizing is rather expensive to re-apply. With all the restrictions, its hard to even get the proper chemicals. It preserves the casting just as the gold anodizing on the carburetors. Its OK to paint it all black. But the paint will come off as soon as the fluid hits it. All the factory photos I have are black and white...
2002 Lincoln Blackwood Black on Black on Black on Black ...did I say Black...
2007 Mercury Gran Marquis
1959 Lincoln Continental Coupe (blk on blk)
430 Tri-Power Super Marauder
1959 Lincoln Continental Convertible (wht on wht)

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